Cleaning Medical Equipment

 

No one wants to go to a hospital or dentist but if you have to go, it’s helpful to know that they have clean, sterile equipment. The dangers of using equipment that have already been used for other patients doesn’t bear thinking about and thankfully, as time has gone one, we don’t share scalpels anymore! The advancement of medicine has meant that medical establishments are more and more stepping up their cleaning game! Until recently, the most advanced sterilization technology was found only in large hospital sterilizers. There is now a growing demand for more sophisticated sterilization technologies in a variety of professions. For the larger medical equipment items, solvents bought from a solvent for vapour degreasing can do the job and do it well. By following a few simple steps, you can have clean, sterilized instruments that can be used in any medical situation.

  • Instruments that have been used need to be collected and removed from the area where they were used. Take them to the area where you decontaminate things in your environment, such as a Decontamination Area in a Processing Department. This will help cut down on the chance of the contamination of the personal areas or other surfaces within the work space.
  • The instruments should be covered when they are being moved in covered carts, containers, or plastic bags
  • Before you handle any contaminated instruments, you need to be dressed for the part. Workers in areas that decontaminate instruments should wear protective clothing, such as a scrubs or other moisture-resistant clothing. You should also have on show covers. plastic or rubber gloves, and a hair net or other covering.
  • You might also need to wear protective goggles in certain situation if the substance you are using the decontaminate the instruments splatters
  • Before starting to clean your instruments, you must be sterile so you won’t transfer any bacteria or germs to the instruments. You should wear a sterile gown while washing the instruments. You then need to put on a sterile cap for your hair and cover your face with a mask. You need to wear protective eye covers, which will keep any potentially hazardous liquid from splashing into your eyes. Finish by putting on a pair of sterile gloves.
  • Instruments must be cleaned immediately after use and before you attempt to sterilize them — cleaning the instruments is not the same as sterilizing them. Remove inorganic and organic debris from the instruments with a soft plastic scrub brush and medically approved detergent. Scrub each instrument well to remove all residual matter, such as blood or organic tissue. If the instrument is hinged or opens, make sure you clean the inside and outside surfaces. You don’t want any residual matter to get stuck in the gears. After you scrub them, you need to run the instruments under pressured water to make sure any extra matter is cleared off. This also helps clean areas that are unable to be reached by brushes.
  • If you don’t wash the instruments beforehand, the process may not sterilize the materials and compromise the whole endeavour. There are solutions available to soak the instruments in. Look for a neutral pH detergents solution. Added enzymes will also make it easier to clean the surface of the instruments. If not cleaned properly, it may affect the health of the patient.
  • There are automatic washers that you can use for this stage, but their use depends on the facility and location of the cleaning process